Year 11 — Geography

Term 2: The Changing Economic World

The Changing Economic World (12% of GCSE) -

Students will focus on global economic variations. Strategies to reduce the development gap along with changing patterns in the UK’s economy will also be investigated.

This unit will be assessed through the year 11 mock exam/ 1hr 30 mins):

Students will be assessed on global economic variations. Strategies to reduce the development gap along with changing patterns in the UK’s economy.

Mock Exam:

Paper 1 – Living with the Physical Environment (1 hour 30 minutes)

88 marks including 3 for SPaG

35% of GCSE

Paper 2 – Challenges in the Human Environment

1 hour 30 minutes

88 marks including 3 for SPaG

35% of GCSE

Appropriate technology

Or intermediate technology, is technology suited to the needs, skills, knowledge and wealth of local people and their environment

Birth rate

The number of births a year per 1000 of the total population

Death rate

The number of deaths in a year per 1000 of the total population

Debt crisis

When a country cannot pay its debts, often leading to calls to other countries for assistance

Debt relief

Cancellation of debts to a country by a global organisation such as the World Bank

Development

The progress of a country in terms of economic growth, the use of technology and human welfare

Development gap

Difference in standards of living and wellbeing between the world's richest and poorest countries

Economic opportunities

Chances for people to improve their standard of living through employment

Fair trade

Producers in LICs given a better price for their goods such as cocoa, coffee and cotton

Gross National Income (GNI)

Measurement of economic activity calculated by dividing the gross (total) national income by the size of the population

High income country (HIC)

A country with GNI per capita (person) higher than $12,746 (World Bank, 2013)

Human Development Index (HDI)

A method of measuring development where GDP per capita, life expectancy and adult literacy are combined to give an overview

Industrial structure

Relative proportion of the workforce employed in different sectors of the economy

Inequalities

Differences between poverty and wealth, as well as wellbeing and access to jobs, housing, education, etc.

Infant mortality

Number of babies that die under one year of age, per 1000 live births

Informal economy

employment outside the official knowledge of the government

Life expectancy

The average number of years a person is expected to live

Literacy rate

Percentage of people in a country who have basic reading and writing skills

Newly-emerging economies

Countries that have begun to experience high rates of economic development, usually along with rapid industrialisation

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Students understand the different quality of life that people in other countries have. They appreciate their quality of life and develop an understanding of ways in which their lifestyle choices can positively impact others.

Create a supportive community:

Students learn about activities they can practice in order to help other people to have a better quality of life e.g. buying Fairtrade products.

Term 1: Natural Hazards

Natural Hazards (13 % of GCSE) -

Students will focus on natural hazards both globally and in the UK. A range of case studies are looked at ranging from earthquakes & volcanoes to tsunamis & flooding.

The effect that these natural hazards have on people will be studied as well as responses from all around the world.

End of unit written exam - (50 mins) Students will be assessed on natural hazards both globally and in the UK. The assessment will focus on the effect that these natural hazards have on people and the global response. Students understanding will be assessed through a range of case studies, ranging from earthquakes & volcanoes to tsunamis & flooding.

Tectonic hazard

Natural hazard caused by the movement of tectonic plates (i.e. volcanoes and earthquakes)

Volcano

An opening in the Earth's crust from which lava, ash and gases erupt

Tropical storm

An area of low pressure with winds moving in a spiral around a calm central point called the eye of the storm - winds are powerful and rainfall is heavy

Earthquake

A sudden or violent movement within the Earth's crust followed by a series of shocks

Conservative plate margin

Two plates sliding alongside each other, in the same or different directions

Constructive plate margin

Tectonic plate margin where rising magma adds new material to plates that are moving apart/diverging

Destructive plate margin

Tectonic plate margin where two plates are converging/moving towards each other. The oceanic plate sinks down/is subducted underneath the continental plate. There could be violent earthquakes and explosive volcanoes.

Hazard risk

Probability or chance that a natural hazard may take place

Immediate responses

Reaction of people as the disaster happens and in the immediate aftermath

International aid

Money, goods and services given by single governments or an organisation (e.g. World Bank or IMF) to help the quality of life and economy of another country

Long term responses

Later reactions that occur in the weeks, months and years after the event

Monitoring

Recording physical changes (i.e. tracking a tropical storm by satellite) to help forecast where and when a natural hazard might strike

Mitigation

Action taken to reduce the long-term risk from natural hazards, such as earthquake-proof buildings or international agreements to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Planning

Actions taken to enable communities to respond to, and recover from, natural disasters

Plate margin

The border between two tectonic plates

Primary effects

Initial impact of a natural event on people and property, caused directly by it (i.e. the buildings collapsing following an earthquake)

Protection

Actions taken before a hazard strikes to reduce its impact, such as educating people or improving building design

Secondary effects

After-effects that occur as indirect impacts of a natural event, sometimes on a longer time scale (i.e. fires due to ruptured gas mains, resulting from the ground shaking)

Social impact

The effect of an event on the lives of people or community

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Students learn about the consequences of natural hazards on society and the economy. They learn how the development of a country directly impacts upon its ability to cope with a hazard or risk of hazard. Students gain a greater understanding of the differences in communities around the world.

Create a supportive community:

Students develop a greater empathy for communities from less developed countries who are unable to support themselves during or after a natural hazard.

Term 3 & 4: Natural Hazards / Revision, Synoptic, Skills, Issue Evaluation & Pre-Release

Natural Hazards

Tectonic and weather hazards will be completed.

Revision/ Synoptic/ Skills/ Issue Evaluation & Pre-Release -

Pre-release booklet for synoptic Paper 3 is released 12 weeks before the exam.

Students will focus on skills necessary for Paper 3 along with consolidating knowledge gained from Papers 1 and 2.

Fieldwork/Synoptic Paper will make up 30% of the GCSE

Natural Hazards

This unit will be assessed within section A of paper 1.

Field Work Techniques/ Issue Evaluation & Pre-Release (Paper 3):

Paper 3 – Geographical Applications Exam

1 hour 15 minutes

76 marks including 6 for SPaG

30% of GCSE

Preparation/pre-release booklet for synoptic Paper 3 is released 12 weeks before the exam.

Cross profile

The side-by-side cross section of a river channel and/or valley

Long profile

The gradient of a river, from its source to its mouth

Primary data

Fieldwork data which you collect yourself (or as part of a group)

Secondary data

Information that another person/group/organisation has collected

Quantitative data

All quantitative data techniques need equipment and involve numbers or counting.

Qualitative data

This includes techniques that don't involve numbers of counting. They are subjective and involve the judgement of the person collecting the data.

Fieldwork

Means work carried out in the outdoors

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Students develop practical fieldwork skills. They experience natural environments and develop a greater appreciation for natural landscapes.

Create a supportive community:

Students develop team work in order to work together to complete their field studies projects.

Term 5 & 6: Revision & Exams

Preparation for final GCSE exams.

Revision/Exams -

Paper 1 – Living with the Physical Environment

1 hour 30 minutes

88 marks including 3 for SPaG

35% of GCSE

Paper 2 – Challenges in the Human Environment

1 hour 30 minutes

88 marks including 3 for SPaG

35% of GCSE

Paper 3 – Geographical Applications

1 hour 15 minutes

76 marks including 6 for SPaG

30% of GCSE

Evaluation

The last part of a fieldwork enquiry process which aims to both evaluate and reflect on the process of collecting data and the overall quality of the results and conclusion

Data analysis

make links between different sets of data, identify patterns in data and explain reasons for them; as well as identify anomalies and explain reasons for them

Conclusion

state whether the main aim of your fieldwork investigation was met and outline the most important data that supports this

Qualitative data

involves a number of fieldwork techniques that don't involve numbers or counting e.g. field sketches or interviews

Quantitative data

fieldwork techniques that require the use of equipment or recording sheets e.g. river width and depth

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Students revisit and recap their learning and develop revision techniques to help them to prepare for their final GCSE exams.

Create a supportive community:

Students develop independent learning skills but also support one another by group revision tasks. They also share model answers and peer assess each other's work in order to develop one another's work.