Year 7 — Drama

Term 1: Introduction to Drama

Introduction to Drama - This unit is designed to introduce Year 7 students to basic Drama skills and vocabulary at the start of their KS3 Drama career. It provides students with the opportunity to develop team work and creative thinking skills.

Practical performance at the end of the unit incorporating the new skills the students have learnt.

Facial Expression

Conveys an emotion that tells us about the character and the way they react to a situation.

Co-operation

The action or process of working together to the same end.

Teamwork

To work together as a team and commit clearly to that group.

Respect

A feeling of deep admiration for someone or something elicited by their abilities, qualities, or achievements.

Explorative strategy

An explorative strategy is a technique to explore and deepen understanding of the drama you create

still image

A single freeze frame, a still image.

role play

Is the act of imitating the character and behaviour of someone who is different from yourself.

slow motion

When movement and action is deliberately performed slowly in order to draw attention to the moment.

Physical Theatre

A mime technique in which actors use their bodies to create props or part of the set.

Greek chorus

A speech spoken by more than one person. Can be spoken in unison or with words and phrases repeated or echoed through the speech.

narration

The retelling of a story.

rehearsal

The process of preparing a production and getting it ready for performance.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

A warm welcome to the world of drama. Tasks encourage collaboration and creativity working in groups of 2, 4 and as a whole class. Students will work to problem solve and deliver key skills to time constraints in a fun atmosphere.

Create a supportive community:

Students will develop directing skills and independence in small structured practical explorations. A culture of positive support begins in the drama studio where students offer positive feedback on the drama shared in each lesson and how to develop further.

Term 2: Introduction to Drama

Introduction to Drama - This unit is designed to introduce Year 7 students to basic Drama skills and vocabulary at the start of their KS3 Drama career. It provides students with the opportunity to develop team work and creative thinking skills.

A warm welcome to the world of drama. Tasks encourage collaboration and creativity working in groups of 2, 4 and as a whole class. Students will work to problem solve and deliver key skills to time constraints in a fun atmosphere.

Improvisation

A activity of making or doing something not planned beforehand.

Co-operation

The action or process of working together to the same end.

Teamwork

To work together as a team and commit clearly to that group.

Respect

A feeling of deep admiration for someone or something elicited by their abilities, qualities, or achievements.

Explorative strategy

An explorative strategy is a technique to explore and deepen understanding of the drama you create

still image

A single freeze frame, a still image.

role play

Is the act of imitating the character and behaviour of someone who is different from yourself.

slow motion

When movement and action is deliberately performed slowly in order to draw attention to the moment.

Physical Theatre

A mime technique in which actors use their bodies to create props or part of the set.

narration

The retelling of a story.

Rehearsal

The process of preparing a production and getting it ready for performance.

Greek chorus

A speech spoken by more than one person. Can be spoken in unison or with words and phrases repeated or echoed through the speech.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

A warm welcome to the world of drama. Tasks encourage collaboration and creativity working in groups of 2, 4 and as a whole class. Students will work to problem solve and deliver key skills to time constraints in a fun atmosphere.

Create a supportive community:

Students will develop directing skills and independence in small structured practical explorations. A culture of positive support begins in the drama studio where students offer positive feedback on the drama shared in each lesson and how to develop further.

Term 3: Shoe Box Project

You will show understanding of different staging and work from a stimulus, this will then lead to development and creativity of a set design using a shoe box, this will then lead to script work and movie making.

You will work on a script based on movie and play ideas using the set design.

Finally you will understand the principles of stage design and how it can be used with a working script

To take part in a quiz based on staging

Rehearsal

The process of preparing a production and getting it ready for performance.

Improvisation

Something that is improvised, in particular a piece of music, drama, etc. created spontaneously or without preparation.

Stimulus

In drama, stimuli refer to the drama texts, videos and photos, etc available to work with.

Genre

The type of story being told.

Physical Theatre

A mime technique in which actors use their bodies to create props or part of the set.

Monologue

A long speech by one actor in a play or film

Duologue

A play or part of a play with speaking roles for only two actors.

Vocal Skills

Vocal skills and techniques eg clarity of diction, inflection, accent, intonation and phrasing; pace, pause and timing; projection, pitch; emotional range; song and/or choral speaking.

Physical Skills

Physical skills and techniques eg movement, body language, posture, gesture, gait, co-ordination, stillness, timing, control; facial expression; eye contact, listening, expression of mood; spatial awareness; interaction with other performers;

Blocking

The process of placing performers in a specific space.

Character

A character is a person, animal, being, creature, or thing in a story.

Levels

Levels can be created through position of the body, set or staging. They show action in a different place/time and can reflect relationships.

Audience

The assembled spectators or listeners at a public event such as a play, film, concert, or meeting

Staging

There are many different types of staging, each presenting unique challenges and opportunities when creating a performance: proscenium arch,end-on, in the round, traverse, thrust, promenade.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Development of creativity and collaborative skills.

Create a supportive community:

Develop as creative, effective, independent and reflective students able to make informed choices in process and designing.

Term 4: Charlie And The Chocolate Factory

You will show understanding of different genres and to work from a stimulus. This will then lead to development of improvisation and how to use it in the rehearsal process.

You will work collaboratively to create a physical theatre performance to enhance characterisation.

Finally you will understand the differences between a monologue and duologue and to be able to apply vocal and physical skills to the performance.

To perform a monologue or duologue in front of your class.

Rehearsal

The process of preparing a production and getting it ready for performance.

Improvisation

Something that is improvised, in particular a piece of music, drama, etc. created spontaneously or without preparation.

Stimulus

In drama, stimuli refer to the drama texts, videos and photos, etc available to work with.

Genre

The type of story being told.

Physical Theatre

A mime technique in which actors use their bodies to create props or part of the set.

Monologue

A long speech by one actor in a play or film

Duologue

A play or part of a play with speaking roles for only two actors.

Vocal Skills

Vocal skills and techniques eg clarity of diction, inflection, accent, intonation and phrasing; pace, pause and timing; projection, pitch; emotional range; song and/or choral speaking.

Physical Skills

Physical skills and techniques eg movement, body language, posture, gesture, gait, co-ordination, stillness, timing, control; facial expression; eye contact, listening, expression of mood; spatial awareness; interaction with other performers;

Blocking

The process of placing performers in a specific space.

Character

A character is a person, animal, being, creature, or thing in a story.

Levels

Levels can be created through position of the body, set or staging. They show action in a different place/time and can reflect relationships.

Staging

There are many different types of staging, each presenting unique challenges and opportunities when creating a performance: proscenium arch,end-on, in the round, traverse, thrust, promenade.

Audience

The assembled spectators or listeners at a public event such as a play, film, concert, or meeting

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Development of creativity and collaborative skills.

Create a supportive community:

Develop as creative, effective, independent and reflective students able to make informed choices in process and performance

Term 5: Heroes and Villains

To be able to explore different ways of structuring thought. To be able to develop your own superhero or villain through characterisation. To explore the different ways of engaging an audience. To demonstrate an understanding of the different explorative strategies used in performance.

Students to create and perform their own superhero and villain role-plays using different explorative strategies to structure them.

Thought Track

A thought-track is when a character steps out of a scene to address the audience about how they're feeling. Sharing thoughts in this way provides deeper insight into the character for an audience. ... Sometimes the character might feel something different

Characterisation

A character is a person, animal, being, creature, or thing in a story.

Vocal Skills

Vocal skills and techniques eg clarity of diction, inflection, accent, intonation and phrasing; pace, pause and timing; projection, pitch; emotional range; song and/or choral speaking.

Physical Skills

Physical skills and techniques eg movement, body language, posture, gesture, gait, co-ordination, stillness, timing, control; facial expression; eye contact, listening, expression of mood; spatial awareness; interaction with other performers;

Audience Awareness

If you repeatedly turn your back to some of the audience when addressing another character then your performance is lost. It is said that you have 'upstaged yourself'. Movement is important because it gives a scene pace and energy.

Narrator

Narration is a technique whereby one or more performers speak directly to the audience to tell a story, give information or comment on the action of the scene or the motivations of characters. Characters may narrate, or a performer who is not involved in

Script

A written version of a play or other dramatic composition; used in preparing for a performance

Direct Speech

Each moment of direct address is a moment of direct connection with the audience. It is a moment in which the character needs to off-load a worry or give an opinion, and check where the audience are with their thoughts on what is happening.

Explorative Strategy

Explorative strategies are techniques that you can use to gain a deeper understanding of characters, to explore scenes and to experiment with characterisation.

Drama medium

There's a lot to think about when you're planning to stage a drama. You'll need to combine a range of elements that are appropriate to your project, such as costume, language, sound and music.

Rehearsal

The process of preparing a production and getting it ready for performance.

Split Scene

Cross-cutting is an excellent way to explore the contrast between situations by making differences clear for the audience. It can also be used to give them additional information. It enables performers to move quickly between locations and scenes without

Flashback

A scene enacting something that happened in the past; the enactment of a character's memory of a past event.

Flash forward

A flashforward is a scene that temporarily takes the narrative forward in time from the current point of the story in literature, film, television and other media.

Still image

Still images can be made by individuals, small groups or even the whole group. A still image is like pressing the pause button on a remote control, taking a photo or making a statue.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

To build confidence in using more advanced skills and techniques in the rehearsal process.

Create a supportive community:

Students to continue to develop a supportive group ethos where groups of different abilities can work together creatively

Term 6: Devised Project

Students will use a combination of explorative strategies and skills learnt over the last year to create their own performances. Students are expected to incorporate music and sfx to their devised projects.

Students use all the drama skills they have learnt this year to create a devised piece of Drama, as a final performance piece in Year 7.

Physical Theatre

A form of theatre which emphasizes the use of physical movement, as in dance and mime, for expression

Rehearsal

The process of preparing a production and getting it ready for performance.

Stimulus

In drama, stimuli refer to the drama texts, videos and photos, etc available to work with.

Vocal Skills

Vocal skills and techniques eg clarity of diction, inflection, accent, intonation and phrasing; pace, pause and timing; projection, pitch; emotional range; song and/or choral speaking.

Physical Skills

Physical skills and techniques eg movement, body language, posture, gesture, gait, co-ordination, stillness, timing, control; facial expression; eye contact, listening, expression of mood; spatial awareness; interaction with other performers;

Blocking

The process of placing performers in a specific space.

Character

A character is a person, animal, being, creature, or thing in a story.

Staging

There are many different types of staging, each presenting unique challenges and opportunities when creating a performance: proscenium arch,end-on, in the round, traverse, thrust, promenade.

Audience Awareness

If you repeatedly turn your back to some of the audience when addressing another character then your performance is lost. It is said that you have 'upstaged yourself'. Movement is important because it gives a scene pace and energy.

Devising

Devising is a group collaboration in response to a stimulus leading to the creation of an original performance. Devising in drama demands inventiveness, an understanding of the rules of structuring a piece of theatre and a readiness to collaborate

Explorative strategy

Explorative strategies are techniques that you can use to gain a deeper understanding of characters, to explore scenes and to experiment with characterisation.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Continuing on the work from the past year, students should be confident enough to create their own devised pieces based around the stimulus given to them. This is will be very reflective on what GCSE students are studying.

Create a supportive community:

Students to present their scenes to an invited audience to gain experience of the pressure of performance