Year 7 — English

Term 1 : Fairytales

Reading: Fairytales

Students will look at a variety of extracts from fairy tales and closely analyse the writers' use of language and its effect on the reader. To develop and nurture their English Literature skills, students will be working with their English teachers ohow to build key on their key skills. Pupils will be identifying, inferring, deducing and explaining. They will be taught to write in clear PEE (Point/ Evidence/ Explanation) paragraphs, selecting suitable quotations from the text as supporting evidence to demonstrate their understanding of the textual content they have read. This would help build their confidence and competence in preparation for the reading assessment.

Writing: Imaginative writing

Students will practice creative writing skills and understand how to effectively employ a range of stylistic devices in their own writing. They will have a strong focus on their use of SPAG.

1. Reading: Extracts from fairy tales looking closely at use of language and its effect on the reader.

2. Writing: Imaginative writing using language form and structure to write their own fairy tales.

Infer

Deduce or conclude (something) from evidence and reasoning rather than from explicit statements

Structure

Construct or arrange according to a plan; give a pattern or organization to.

Interpretation

The action of explaining the meaning of something through the evidence presented.

Mood

A temporary state of mind or feeling.

Imagery

Visually descriptive or figurative language, especially in a literary work.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Create a supportive community:

Term 2: Reading a fiction text - Literature (Skellig by David Almond)

Pupils will read the fiction book 'Skellig' by David Almond to build on their basic English Literature Skills. They will practise reading and comprehension of a text, analysing the writer’s use of Language and Structure. The key focus here will be on understanding plot, character and themes from the book. Pupils will be taught to write in clear PEE (Point/ Evidence/ Explanation) paragraphs, selecting suitable quotations from the book as supporting evidence to demonstrate their understanding of textual content. This would help build their confidence in preparation for the End-of-term Literature assessment.

1. Literature: Write a response to an unseen question based on a particular chapter. Pupils will have to use the PEE framework in their writing.

Focus on: Character, inference, language, etc.

2. Imaginative Writing: Writing about a character within the novel.

Premature

Occurring or done before the usual or proper time; too early.

Supernatural

Attributed to some force beyond scientific understanding or the laws of nature.

Isolation

The process or fact of isolating or being isolated.

Arthritis

A disease causing painful inflammation and stiffness of the joints.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Spiritual, social and cultural. Develop the individual: Students will consider a range of literary forms. They will learn how to approach an unseen text, focusing on language, form and structure, which will in turn feed into their GCSE study. Students will be asked to use empathy skills in order to appreciate the context of the texts they read.

Create a supportive community:

Term 3: Shakespeare: Midsummer Night’s Dream

Pupils will read sections of William Shakespeare’s ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’ to build on their basic English Literature Skills. They will practise reading and comprehension of a Shakespeare text, analysing the writer’s use of language and structure. The key focus here will be on understanding plot, character and themes from the play. However, pupils will also explore aspects of the social and historical factors underlying the play, such as pre-Shakepearean entertainment, Shakespeare's Globe theatre; visiting the theatre in Elizabethan times and the beliefs, traditions and values of the period which would have shaped the ways in which Shakespeare's audiences received his plays. Pupils will be taught to write in clear PEE (Point/ Evidence/ Explanation) paragraphs, selecting suitable quotations from the play as supporting evidence to demonstrate their understanding of textual content. This would help build their confidence in preparation for the end of term Literature assessment.

Literature: analytic written response to the whole play. (20 marks)

Elizabethan period

The period when Shakespeare wrote many of his plays, including 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' is named after Queen Elizabeth I, who reigned from 1558-1603). The audiences of this time (Elizabethans) were the first to watch Shakespeare's plays.

Fairies

In 'A Midsummer Night's Dream', the four fairies who wait on Queen Titania represent Shakespeare's interpretation of what fairy folk might be. He made his fairies, more benevolent than the traditional folklore of the time dictated.

Love

The dominant theme in 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' is love. Shakespeare returns constantly to this theme in his comedies. One of the ideas of this play is that real love is much more than mere physical attraction.

Appearance and Reality

A key theme of 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' is the difference between appearance and reality. The idea that things are not necessarily what they seem to be is at the heart of the play and in the very title itself.

Dramatic Irony

Shakespeare uses dramatic irony in this play, which is when the audience knows something which characters in the play do not. Dramatic irony is often used to make the audience more involved - we know what is happening but feel powerless to do anything.

Conflict

Conflict is the essence of dramatic story telling and is at the centre of all dramas. Without conflict, there can be no drama. Like most of the conflict in Shakespearean comedies, in 'A Midsummer Night's Dream', conflict is mostly silly and petty.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Spiritual, social and cultural skills developed. Develop the individual: Students will consider a range of literary forms. They will learn how to approach an unseen text, focusing on language, form and structure, which will in turn feed into their GCSE study. Students will be asked to use empathy skills in order to appreciate the context of the texts they read.

Create a supportive community:

Spiritual, social and cultural skills developed. Develop the community: Students will consider a range of literary forms. They will learn how to approach an unseen text, focusing on language, form and structure, which will in turn feed into their GCSE study. Students will be asked to use empathy skills in order to appreciate the context of the texts they read.

Term 4: Non-fiction: Exam Preparation

Students will work with their teachers on annotating a range of fiction and non-fiction extracts for key ideas that the writer includes to successfully develop a theme, mood or argument. Also, pupils will develop understanding of how to write non-fiction text types such as: letters, speeches, articles, reviews and travel writing. Throughout this unit students will also develop their PEE analysis skills, developing their confidence in explaining the effect of key quotations.

1. Non-fiction: Exam Preparation. Modelled on Edexcel’s paper 2 non-fiction paper. Question on unseen text.

2. Transactional writing – To produce a newspaper article, paying close attention to structure and use of language.

Point

The theme/technique/ word which your quote proves. P from PEE.

Evidence

The quote. PEE.

Explain

How does your point and evidence answer the question. PEE

Counter - Argument

An argument which is opposing to the main argument you are making.

Statistics

Percentages, data and other numerical facts which can be used to prove an argument.

Facts

Something that is proved true. Information used as evidence.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Spiritual, social and cultural skills developed. Develop the individual: Students will consider a range of non-fiction literary forms. They will learn how to approach an unseen text, focusing on language, form and structure, which will in turn feed into their GCSE study. Students will be asked to use empathy skills in order to appreciate the context of the texts they read.

Create a supportive community:

Spiritual, social and cultural skills developed. Develop the community: Students will consider a range of non-fiction literary forms. They will learn how to approach an unseen text, focusing on language, form and structure, which will in turn feed into their GCSE study. Students will be asked to use empathy skills in order to appreciate the context of the texts they read. Students will explore their ideas together, developing listening and appreciation skills.

Term 5: Introduction to Poetry

Pupils will study a range of poems linked by the theme of identity. Pupils will develop key annotation skills that will support their further study of anthology poetry at GCSE. Students will then learn how to make links between poems and compare the ways that writer's have presented key ideas and emotions in explorative paragraphs. To complement this, students will further develop their comparison skills by practising exam questions in preparation for their end of year exam.

End of year exam based on Paper 1 of the Edexcel English GCSE paper.

Section A reading comprehension: fiction texts comprehension

Section B – Imaginative Writing.

Rhetorical Question

Asking a question without requiring the listener to respond.

Enjambment

Continuation of a sentence across more than one line, noticeable by the lack of punctuation at the end of a line.

Meter

The rhythm of a line.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Spiritual, social and cultural skills developed. Develop the individual: Students will consider a range of non-fiction literary forms. They will learn how to approach an unseen text, focusing on language, form and structure, which will in turn feed into their GCSE study. Students will be asked to use empathy skills in order to appreciate the context of the texts they read. Students will explore their ideas together, developing listening and appreciation skills.

Create a supportive community:

Term 6: Modern Drama: Frankenstein

Reading Frankenstein, adapted by Philip Pullman (A Modern Oxford Drama)

Focus on understanding:

-Context

-Language

-Setting

-Characterisation

-Relevant terminology

How does the writer present a specific theme?

Writing: Transactional Letter

SPAG skills will be developed: Standard English: looking at formal and informal registers.

Advanced punctuation: speech marks; semi-colons and colons; different types of sentences.

End of year exam based on Paper 2 of the GCSE English exam.

Section A: reading comprehension of non-fiction texts.

Section B – transactional writing focusing on content and SPAG accuracy.

Gothic

Relating to the Goths or their extinct language, which belongs to the East Germanic branch of the Indo-European language family. It provides the earliest manuscript evidence of any Germanic language (4th–6th centuries AD).

Tragedy

The story shown is sad and usually involves the death or downfall of its main characters

Flashback/foward

The scene shows an event that happened earlier in the story or later in the story

Monologue

A character that has a fairly long speech that gives the audience an insight into their thoughts and feelings

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Spiritual, social and cultural skills developed. Develop the individual: Students will consider a range of non-fiction literary forms. They will learn how to approach an unseen text, focusing on language, form and structure, which will in turn feed into their GCSE study. Students will be asked to use empathy skills in order to appreciate the context of the texts they read.

Create a supportive community:

Spiritual, social and cultural skills developed. Develop the community: Students will consider a range of non-fiction literary forms. They will learn how to approach an unseen text, focusing on language, form and structure, which will in turn feed into their GCSE study. Students will be asked to use empathy skills in order to appreciate the context of the texts they read. Students will explore their ideas together, developing listening and appreciation skills. They will learn to share ideas and different interpretations about the texts in a safe and respectful way.