Year 10 — Psychology

Term 1: Social Infuence

Students will develop knowledge of conformity, obedience, prosocial, crowd and collective behaviour.

End of Term assessments. Homework and Exam.

Agency

The awareness we have of carrying out and being in control of our own actions.

Anonymity

Being unknown to most people; not able to be identified.

Antisocial behaviour

Acting in ways that are socially unacceptable.

Authoritarian personality

A person who has a strong belief that authority figures should be obeyed. A person who is obedient to people who are in authority or have a higher status than them has this type of personality.

Authority

When a person has the right to give orders, or when they are perceived by others to have the right to do so.

Bystander behaviour

The way that an individual acts when they see someone needing help.

Conformity

When perceived group pressure leads to people changing their opinions or behaviours in order to fit in with socially accepted conventions and norms.

Crowd

A large group of individuals who gather together temporarily for a common reason

Ecological validity

The results of the investigation can be said to apply to real-life behaviour; they are an accurate account of behaviour in the real world.

Majority influence

When the opinions or behaviours of a large number of people influence the opinions or behaviours of a smaller group of people. This usually results in conformity.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

1. understanding group behaviour and dynamics of why and how people behave in social groups and scenarios. 2. Respect, relationships, including friendships. 3. Moral development of pupils

Create a supportive community:

Develop an understanding of the interrelationships between the core areas of psychology. When carrying out practical research activities, students will manage associated risks and use information to analyse psychological information, ideas, processes and procedures on order to apply these concepts to real every day situations.

Term 2: Memory

Students will demonstrate and apply knowledge and understanding of psychological ideas, processes, procedures and theories in relation to memory.

End of Term assessments. Homework and exam.

Coding

The way that information is represented to be stored.

Context

The surroundings for an event, thought or memory which enable these things to be more fully understood and may act as a cue to recall.

Encoding

Information taken into the memory is changed into a form that can be stored and later recalled.

Episodic memory

Recollections of personal experiences or events, (may include feelings as well as recall of what took place).

Expectation

Beliefs or feelings about what it is that we will experience.

False memories

Remembering something that has never happened but feels as if it did.

Long-term store

Memory store that has a very large capacity and holds information for a very long time

Primacy effect

When more of the first information received is recalled than later information.

Procedural memory

Stored knowledge and information that we use for carrying out complex motor skills.

Reconstructive memory

Changing or filling in gaps in our recollection of experiences or information so that it makes more sense to us.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Future learning: perception, brain and neuropsychology, language, thought and communication, perception. Research methodology, revision strategies. Mathematical skills

Create a supportive community:

To broaden their knowledge and understanding of Structures of memory, these can be used to further their information retention and revision skills.

Term 3: Perception

Students will develop knowledge of perception in psychology through, sensation and perception; Visual cues and constancies; Gibson direct theory of perception – influence of nature; Visual illusions; Gregory’s constructivist theory of perception – the influence of nurture; factors affecting perception.

End of Term assessments. Homework and exam.

Accommodation

When we receive new information or experience a new situation, a type of learning happens that causes us to change an existing schema or developing a new schema.

Binocular depth cues

Ways of perceiving depth or distance that need two eyes.

Depth cue

Ways of perceiving depth or distance – may be binocular or monocular.

Expectation

Beliefs or feelings about what it is that we will experience.

Height in plane

Distant objects are seen or shown as being higher in the visual field in relation to items that are nearer.

Inference

Reaching a conclusion based on the information you have before you and your past experiences. Our inferences are not always correct as we may not have the 'whole picture'.

Monocular depth cue

Ways of perceiving depth or distance that will work with just one eye.

Motivation

Physiological and psychological drives and needs that we experience and that can affect a person's choices, actions and perception.

Motion parallax

Close objects in our visual field seem to move more than objects that are further away in our visual field.

Occlusion

When an object covers part of another object, this makes it appear to be closer.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

To broaden their knowledge and understanding of perception.

Create a supportive community:

The cultural development of pupils is shown by their understanding that perception is subjective to individuals and by culture. This in turn widens their perspective on how wider community functions in terms of what people see and believe to be true is dependent on how they see it, they culture and interpretations.

Term 4: Development

Students will develop knowledge of development psychology including early brain development, Piaget’s stage theory and the development of intelligence, and the effects of learning on development.

Exam, End of term test.

Assimilation

When we receive new information or experience a new situation, a type of learning that causes us to add new information to an existing schema.

Brain stem

The part of the base of the brain that is connected to the spinal cord and controls messages between the brain and the rest of the body. It also controls bodily functions such as breathing and heart rate.

Cognition

Mental processes such as thinking, planning and problem solving.

Cognitive development

The changes and advancements that take place over time in an individual's mental processes.

Concrete operational

Being able to apply logic when using physical objects in order to solve problems.

Conservation

Being aware that the quantity of something is still the same, even if it looks different.

Development

The manner in which, over time, someone grows and changes and becomes more advanced.

Frontal lobe

One of the four major lobes of the cerebral cortex, the frontal lobe is at the front of the brain and controls cognitive processes such as thought and memory.

Growth mindset

Belief that ability and achievement are due to hard work and can be increased through effort.

Learning styles

The different ways that a person can pick up and process information and knowledge.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

IT would help develop them as individuals in the following ways: Relationships 1. Families 2. Respectful relationships, including friendships Health 1. Mental wellbeing 2. Changing adolescent bodies 3.The spiritual development of pupils is shown by their

Create a supportive community:

Will be bench marked against specification standards for all areas within development psychology in preparation for outcomes of exam based assessment.

Term 5: Research Methods

Students should develop and understanding of the methodological and mathematical concepts of psychological research.

End of unit tests, homework, research project and exam.

Case study

An in-depth investigation of an individual, group, organisation or specific situation.

Counterbalancing

An arrangement used in repeated measures design to even out order effects. Half of the participants take part in the conditions in one order (A followed by B) while the other half take part in them in the opposite order (B followed by A).

Decimal

Numbers where a point is used to separate whole numbers from parts. Numbers can be placed to the left or right of the point, to show values greater than one or less than one.

Dependent variable (DV)

The thing that will be measured by a researcher to see if changing the IV has had any effect.

Ecological validity

The results of the investigation can be said to apply to real-life behaviour; they are an accurate account of behaviour in the real world.

Estimate

Figures are rounded to make the calculation simpler, which makes the answer roughly, but not exactly, right.

Experimental design

How the participants are used in the conditions of an experiment.

Field experiment

An experiment that is carried out in a naturally occurring environment.

Histogram

A type of graph that is used to display the frequency of groups of continuous data. Numerical values are represented by the height or length of lines or rectangles but there are no gaps between the bars and they are arranged in a logical order.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Will be able to describe, apply and evaluate the ethical issues in psychological research. grasp ability to describe, apply and evaluate the use of methodological decisions.

Create a supportive community:

To grasp why and how we research in psychology and the importance of it. for example, mental health, learning and crime. They will be able to learn that in order to change beliefs and issues in society, we must first gain knowledge by researching that topic and the specific scientific method of obtaining important findings.

Term 6: Revision

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Create a supportive community: