Year 10 — Geography

Term 1: Physical Landscapes of the UK

Physical Landscapes of the UK (12% of GCSE) -

Students will focus on coastal and river landscapes in the UK for this topic. The processes carried out in both of these landscapes will be looked into along with relationship that we have with all of them. Case studies will be used to solidify any topics covered.

Mid unit written exam - Coasts (50 mins) - Students will be assessed on coastal landscapes of the UK. The exam will assess student understanding of coastal landforms created by both erosion and deposition such as headlands and bays, spits and bars and coastal management in the UK.

Abrasion

Erosion of land by sea. Sea hurls stones and pebbles at the land, as the incoming wave (swash) breaks.

Attrition

Erosion of large boulders in the sea. Large boulders in the sea smash into each other and break each other up into smaller pieces.

Corrosion

A type of erosion. Acids in sea water dissolve mineral in the rock - a chemical reaction.

Hydraulic action

A type of erosion - the physical action of the water pounding into cracks in the cliff, forcing them open.

Longshore Drift

The transportation of sediment along a coastline, by the sea. The swash carried material into the coast at an angle. The backwash carries material back out in a straight line. The process continues.

Deposition

When the sea loses energy and drops its load along the coastline.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Students learn how the landscape has changed over millions of years and how it will continue to change into the future. They learn about the impacts of everyday small processes in nature in dramatically altering the landscape of the future.

Create a supportive community:

Students understand the significance of 'impact' in nature and how seemingly insignificant processes can have a huge effect on people and places over time. Students also develop an understanding of the social and economic costs of natural processes and the devastating loss caused to peoples' lives.

Term 2: Physical Landscapes of the UK

Physical Landscapes of the UK (9)

Urban Issues and Challenges (13% of GCSE)

You will focus on the rapidly increasing population of our world. Problems caused by this increase will be focused on and sustainability will be looked to as a main solution.

End of unit Mock Exam - Rivers and Coasts (50 mins )- Students will be assessed on river landforms created by both erosion and deposition such as v shaped valleys, meanders and oxbow lakes and on the physical/human causes and effects of flooding and flood management in the UK.

Deposition

Deposition is the processes where material being transported by a river is deposited. Deposition occurs when a river loses energy. This can be when a river enters a shallow area.

Transportation

The movement of sediment by a river or sea.

Traction

Traction - large, heavy pebbles are rolled along the river bed. This is most common near the source of a river, as here the load is larger.

Saltation

Saltation - pebbles are bounced along the river bed, most commonly near the source.

Suspension

Suspension - lighter sediment is suspended (carried) within the water, most commonly near the mouth of the river.

Solution

Solution - the transport of dissolved chemicals. This varies along the river depending on the presence of soluble rocks.

Abrasion

Rocks carried along a river wear down the river bed and banks

Attrition

Rocks being carried by a river smash together and break into smaller, smoother and rounder particles

Arch

A wave-eroded passage through a small headland. This begins as a cave which is gradually widened and deepened until it is completely cut through

Bar

Where a spit grows across a bay and eventually encloses the bay - trapping a lagoon inside

Beach

A zone of deposited material that extends from the low water line to the limit of storm waves

Beach nourishment

Adding new material to a beach artificially, through the dumping of large amounts of sand or shingle

Beach re-profiling

Changing the profile or shape of a beach.

Cave

A large hole in a cliff caused by waves forcing their way into cracks in the cliff face.

Channel straightening

Removing meanders from a river to make it straighter.

Cliff

A steep high rock face formed by weathering and erosion.

Dam and reservoir

A barrier built across a valley to interrupt river flow and create a man-made lake to store water and control river discharge.

Discharge

Quantity of water that passes a given point on a stream or river bank within a given period of time.

Dune regeneration

Building up dunes and increasing vegetation to prevent excessive coastal retreat.

Embankments

Artificially raised river banks often using concrete walls.

Erosion

Wearing away and removal of material by a moving force, such as a breaking wave.

Flood

Where river discharge (amount of water in river) exceeds river channel capacity and water spills onto the floodplain.

Floodplain zoning

Identifying how a floodplain can be developed for human uses.

Flood relief channels

Artificial channels that are used when a river is close to maximum discharge; they take the pressure off main river channels when floods are likely.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Students develop an understanding of the effects of natural processes on the landscape and on communities and lives.

Create a supportive community:

Students develop an empathy for people who are adversely affected by natural processes.Students also appreciate the impact that their actions can have on nature as well as the effects this can then have on nearby communities.

Term 3: The Living World

The Living World

Students will study two large biome casestudies -Tropical Rainforests and Hot Deserts. Students will consider the causes of Rainforests being lost (deforestation) and deserts spreading (desertification) around the world.

(This unit will be assessed through the end of year 10 exam/ 1hr 30 mins):

Students will be assessed on ecosystems from around the world. Case studies of Tropical Rainforests and Hot Deserts will be focused on. The assessment will focus on the understanding of the key characteristics and relationships in these environments, as well as human activity present.

End of year 10 Exam: (1hr 30 mins)

Physical Landscapes of the UK – Rivers and Coasts.

Urban Issues and Challenges.

The Living World.

88 marks including 3 for SPaG.

Ecosystem

A natural environment - includes the flora (plants) and fauna (animals) that live and interact within that environment.

Biome

A large ecosystem (across several countries) is called a biome. A biome contains particular plant and animal groups, which are adapted to that particular environment.

Tropical Rainforest

A tropical woodland with an annual rainfall of at least 100 inches (254 centimeters) and marked by lofty broad-leaved evergreen trees forming a continuous canopy.

Desertification

the process by which land becomes drier and degraded, as a result of climate change or human activities, or both

Ecotourism

nature tourism usually involving small groups with minimal impact on the environment

Commercial farming

growing crops or raising livestock for profit, often involving vast areas of land

Food web

a complex hierarchy of plants and animals relying on each other for food

Nutrient cycling

on-going recycling of nutrients between living organisms and their environment

Resource management

control and monitoring of resources so that they do not become exhausted

Tundra

a vast, flat, treeless Arctic region of Europe, Asia and North America where the subsoil is permanently frozen

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Students learn about different biomes around the world and the effects that their behaviour indirectly have on these environments. They explore regions and environments which are both rare and fascinating and potentially endangered.

Create a supportive community:

Students appreciate the impact of their lifestyle choices on the fragile biomes around the world. They appreciate other cultures and lifestyles different to their own.

Term 4: Urban Issues and Challenges

Urban Issues and Challenges

(GLH 7)

Fieldwork Techniques -

Students will carry out fieldwork investigations that will involve out-

of-school activities at Juniper Hall FSC. Students will have the opportunity to learn fieldwork skills and investigate both physical and human geographical aspects of our environment.

20 Mark end of unit online assessment covering: Urban Issue and challenges.

Students will be assessed on the reasons for rapid world population growth and the problems caused by this increase. Sustainability will be looked to as a main solution. Students will be assessed on the problems of urban growth through case studies of two global cities, Rio de Janeiro and London.

Sustainable

To meet the needs of the present generation without compromising the needs of future generations to meet their own needs.

Urban regeneration

Urban regeneration is the attempt to reverse urban decline by both improving the physical structure, and, more importantly, the economy of those areas.

Urbanisation

when an increasing percentage of a country's population comes to live in towns and cities

Megacity

an urban area with a total population of more than ten million people

Migration

when people move from one area to another

Low income country (LIC)

a country with a GNI per capita (person) lower than $1045 (World Bank, 2013)

Newly-Emerging Economies (NEE)

countries that have begun to experience high rates of economic development, usually along with rapid industrialisation

High Income Country (HIC)

a country with GNI per capita (person) higher than $12746 (World Bank, 2013)

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Students gain an appreciation of the processes taking place within their society in the UK. They also understand how soci-economic processes are similar or different in different countries around the world.

Create a supportive community:

Students gain an appreciation of how their actions e.g. what products they buy, directly impacts the livelihoods of people on the other side of the world. Students learn how they can alter their lifestyle choices in order to better the life chances of others.

Term 5: Fieldwork Techniques

Fieldwork Techniques

The Living World (10% of GCSE) -

Students will focus on ecosystems from around the world. Case studies of the Tropical Rainforest, Deserts and cold environments will be focused on. An understanding on key characteristics and relationships in these environments will be gained.

Field work preparation and in class practice exam questions.

River cross profile

River cross profiles show you a cross-section of a river's channel and valley at certain points in the river's course.

Urban regeneration

Urban regeneration is the attempt to reverse urban decline in an area by both improving the physical structure, and, more importantly, the economy of those areas.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Students develop practical fieldwork skills. They experience natural and man-made environments and conduct experiments within them.

Create a supportive community:

Students work together in teams in order to carry out their practical fieldwork. They develop team work skills by working together in order to succeed.

Term 6: Challenges of Resource Management

Challenges of Resource Management -

Students will focus on the global distribution of resources and how the demand around the world is changing. Food, water and energy will be used as examples with case studies being used to bring each topic to life.

End of Unit Written Exam (50 mins) - The assessment will focus on the global distribution of resources and how the demand around the world is changing. Case studies will be used to assess student understanding.

Water deficit

Water deficit exists where demand is greater than supply. These are known as WATER DEFICIT areas and can be in deficit because of either low precipitation or high evaporation rates. They might also be in deficit because of high populations.

Water surplus

Water surplus - This exists where water supply is greater than demand.

Resource management

control and monitoring of resources so that they do not become exhausted

Water conflict

disputes between different regions or countries about the distribution and use of fresh water

Water insecurity

when water availability is insufficient to ensure the good health and livelihood of a population, due to short supply or poor quality

Water security

availability of a reliable source of acceptable quantity and quality of water

Water quality

measured in terms of the chemical, physical and biological content of the water

Water stress

when the demand for water exceeds supply in a certain period or when poor quality restricts its use

Water transfer

matching supply with demand by moving water from an area with water surplus to another area with water deficit

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

Students gain an appreciation of the value of every day natural resources which they may otherwise have taken for granted. They understand the social, economic, political and environmental factors relating to the fair distribution of resources around the world.

Create a supportive community:

Students gain an understanding of the complex web of social, economic, political and environmental factors which play a role in the natural resources which they fairly or fairly share each day.