Year 10 — History

Term 1: Medicine Paper 1 - Part 1

The following topics will be considered: 1700-1900: Ideas about legacy of resistance to 1087. Revolt of the cause of disease Earls, 1075. The feudal system and illness. 1700-1900: Approaches to prevention the Church. Norman government. The Norman aristocracy. William I and treatment. 1700-1900 Case Studies: Edward Jenner; John Snow and Cholera. 20th Century: Ideas about the cause of disease and illness. 20th Century: Approaches to prevention and treatment. 20th Century: Penicillin; Lung Cancer. his sons.

GCSE-style 12 mark assessment.

Four humours

The four components that made up the body. They had to be balanced for good health.

Blood letting

When blood is removed by leeches to rebalance the humours.

Lazar

A place where people with leprosy were sent to.

Miasma

Bad smells that cause disease.

Black Death

Worldwide bubonic plague pandemic in the mid 14th century.

Alchemy

Early form of chemistry.

William Harvey

17th century British anatomist.

Pest houses

A place where people with the plague were sent.

Flagellation

When someone whipped their back to apologise for to God for their sins.

Zodiac chart

A star charts used to determine medicine remedy.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

The student learns valuable analytical skills required to answer high level questioning demanding the evaluation of substantive knowledge and assessing change and continuity.

Create a supportive community:

The students understand the importance of colonisation and political displacement and its impact on today's society.

Term 2: Medicine Paper 1 - Part 2; Anglo-Saxon and Norman Conquest - Part 1

The following topics will be considered:

1700-1900: Cause of disease

1700-1900: Approaches to prevention and treatment.

1700-1900: Case studies - Edward Jenner, John Snow,

1900-present: Prevention, treatment, causation.

1900-present: Case study - lung cancer, penicillin.

1912-1918: WWI medicine: surgeries, RAMC, life in trenches, plastic surgery.

Anglo-Saxon society

Anglo-Saxon economy

Anglo-Saxon towns, villages, burhs.

GCSE- style assessment 4 mark and 12 mark question.

Spontaneous generation

The theory that bacteria is caused by decay.

germ theory

The theory that bacteria causes decay (opposite of spontaneous generation).

Carbolic acid

A antiseptic liquid that is used to kill bacteria prior to operations.

Chloroform

An early general anaesthetic to deal with pain.

Cholera

A water-based disease that causes extreme dehydration.

Vaccine

A when a different, but similar, substance is used to prevent a disease.

Innoculation

When a small dose of a disease is given to a patient to prevent getting the disease more seriously later in life.

antibiotics

Drugs that kill bacteria infections.

Penicillin

The first antibiotic.

Magic bullets

Chemicals that kills bacteria that do not harm the body.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

The student learns valuable analytical skills required to answer high level questioning demanding the evaluation of substantive knowledge and assessing change and continuity.

Create a supportive community:

The students understand the importance of medicine in modern society in Britain and across the world

Term 3: Anglo-Saxons and the Norman Conquest - Part 2

Students will consider:

The last years of Edward the Confessor and the succession crisis.

The rival claimants for the throne.

The Norman invasion.

Establishing control.

The causes and outcomes of Anglo Saxon resistance, 1068–71.

Students will be assessed on an GCSE 12 mark question.

Witan

Then council of earls that advised the Anglo-Saxons kings.

Geld tax

The tax paid to the king to pay for armies against the Vikings.

Ceorl

A free peasant

Housecarl

An elite Anglo-Saxon foot-soldier.

Marcher Earldoms

The territories on the border with Wales run by Norman barons.

Tenant-in-chief

A baron who owns a large amount of land and provides knights for the king.

Domesday Book

A large census taken by William of Normandy to ascertain how much wealth there was in England for tax purposes.

Danelaw

The area in the north of England where there was large Viking settlement.

Forest Laws

The laws that prevented English peasants from using the forests for food and fuel.

Royal Demense

The land owned directly by the king.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

The students gains a strong development of key skills involving source inference, essay structure, analysis of source utility and evaluation of historical interpretations,

Create a supportive community:

The students are exposed the integral component of medicine in society and how it has allowed the country to develop.

Term 4: Anglo-Saxons and the Norman Conquest - Part 3

Students will consider:

The legacy of resistance to 1087.

Revolt of the Earls, 1075.

The feudal system and the Church.

Norman government.

The Norman aristocracy.

William I and his sons.

GCSE-style 16 mark question.

Feudalism

The system distribution of landholding and providing soldiers for the king.

Manorial system

The economic system centred around the manor house where peasants work for their local lord.

Earl

A high ranking baron.

Battle of Hastings

A major battle where William of Normandy beat Harold Godwinson for the crown of England.

Primogeniture

The rule where the eldest son inherits all titles and property.

Robert Curthose

William of Normandy's eldest son.

William Rufus

William of Normandy's second son and heir to the throne.

Motte and bailey

Wooden castles set up by the Normans after the conquest of England.

Aristocracy

Powerful landowners.

Vassal

Someone who does homage to someone else usually for land and provides some form of service in exchange.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

The students gains a strong development of key skills involving source inference, essay structure, analysis of source utility and evaluation of historical interpretations,

Create a supportive community:

The students are exposed the integral component of medicine in society and how it has allowed the country to develop.

Term 5: Weimar and Nazi Germany - Part 1

TThe following topics will be considered:

The origins of the Republic, 1918–19.

The early challenges to the Weimar Republic, 1919–23.

The recovery of the Republic, 1924–29.

Changes in society, 1924–29.

GCSE-style assessments under exam-style conditions on The Weimar Republic 1918–29.

Weimar

A place outside Berlin were the Weimar Republic was founded.

Revolution

When a government is replaced by another against its will.

Armistice

A cease fire, usually with mutual consent.

Checks and balances

When a government is held account by other parts of the constitutional government.

Proportional representation

When the proportion of parliament members per party is proportional to the amount of votes received.

German Workers' Party

The early Nazi party.

Spartacist Rebellion

A communist revolution against Weimar Germany.

Kapp Putsch

A rebellion of the Freikorps.

Friedrich Ebert

The first Weimar president.

National Socialist German Workers' Party

The full name of the Nazi party.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

The students gains a strong development of key skills involving source inference, essay structure, analysis of source utility and evaluation of historical interpretations,

Create a supportive community:

The students are exposed the integral component of medicine in society and how it has allowed the country to develop.

Term 6: Weimar and Nazi Germany - Part 2

The following topics will be explored:

Early development of the Nazi Party, 1920–22.

The Munich Putsch and the lean years, 1923–29.

The growth in support for the Nazis, 1929–32.

How Hitler became Chancellor, 1932–33.

GCSE-style assessments under exam-style conditions on Hitler’s rise to power, 1919–33.

Republic

The government without a monarch or autocratic leader.

Kaiser

German word for Caesar/emperor

Diktat

Something that is imposed rather than agreed.

Treaty of Versailles

The treaty imposed on Germany after WWI.

reparations

Money paid for compensation.

hyperinflation

The extreme devaluation of currency. E.g. in Weimar Germany in 1923.

Spartacists

A communist paramilitary organisation.

Freikorps

A nationalist "free Korps" consisting of right-wing ex-soldiers.

fascism

extreme right-wing nationalism

Gustav Stresemann

German Chancellor between 1923-29.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural

Develop the individual:

The students learn the integral skills of understanding, evaluating and comparing historical interpretations as well as inference of sources and analysing source utility.

Create a supportive community:

The students learn about the importance of the manipulation of the democracy and anti-semitism in Germany and the consequences that can be manifested due to the cause of it.